What will it take to end HIV?

What will it take to end HIV?

“Let us not equivocate: a tragedy of unprecedented proportions is unfolding in Africa,” said Nelson Mandela as he stood upon a podium before thousands. The crowd that day was not his usual audience, but he had an important message to convey. “[It] is claiming more...

Professor Brendan Wren

  • Professor Brendan Wren is Professor of Microbial Pathogenesis and Dean of Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. His research interests predominantly involve determining the genetic basis by which bacterial pathogens cause disease and exploiting this to develop vaccines against them.

  • Professor John Edmunds

  • Professor John Edmunds, OBE, is Dean of Faculty of Epidemiology & Population Health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. His research focuses on infectious disease modelling and using data to help guide decision-making bodies internationally. He designed the ring vaccination trial design used to test an Ebola vaccine in Guinea during rhe 2014 epidemic and sits on the UK government’s Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation

  • Professor Liam Smeeth

  • Professor Liam Smeeth is Professor of Clinical Epidemiology  at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. He is a researcher, clinician and general practitioner and led a comprehensive study in 2004 which showed there was no link between autism and MMR.

  • Professor Basia Zaba

  • Prof Zaba has been conducting research into the demography of HIV for over 15 years. She founded the ALPHA network of African HIV community-cohort studies, which links ten studies in the high prevalence countries of Eastern and Southern Africa. As a member of the UNAIDS reference group on estimates, projections and modelling, Prof Zaba ensures that the ALPHA network findings assist in forecasting HIV epidemic dynamics and contribute to policy formulation in care and prevention.

  • Professor Richard Hayes

  • Prof Hayes is one of the School’s most established experts in the epidemiology and control of HIV and related infections, including sexually transmitted diseases and tuberculosis. Based at the School since 1978, his work on major trials includes evaluating effective preventive interventions against the HIV epidemic and the impact of a test-and-treat programme on population-level HIV incidence in Zambia and South Africa.

  • Professor Peter Piot

  • Prof Piot has worked at the heart of two major epidemics: HIV/AIDS and Ebola. His pioneering work in Africa established scientific understanding of the spread of HIV, and his extraordinary leadership in bringing the AIDS epidemic to the forefront of global attention raised international commitments to its funding and built scientifically grounded responses to its control and treatment. By making antiretroviral therapy accessible and fearlessly facing down political opposition in many countries, his actions have saved hundreds of thousands of lives. Prof Piot co-discovered the Ebola virus in 1976 and played a key role in the global response to the recent outbreak in West Africa. He is currently Director of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

  • Professor Charlotte Watts

  • Prof Watts heads the Social and Mathematical Epidemiology Group at the School, and founded our Gender, Violence and Health Centre. Her research provides evidence on how to reduce the vulnerability of women to HIV and violence. A major study led by Prof Watts in 2013 revealed violence against women was a global health problem of epidemic proportions, experienced by 1 in 3 women. She was recently seconded as Chief Scientific Advisor and Director of Research and Evidence at the UK Government’s Department for International Development (DFID).

  • Professor Charlotte Watts

  • Prof Watts heads the Social and Mathematical Epidemiology Group at the School, and founded our Gender, Violence and Health Centre. Her research provides evidence on how to reduce the vulnerability of women to HIV and violence. A major study led by Prof Watts in 2013 revealed violence against women was a global health problem of epidemic proportions, experienced by 1 in 3 women. She was recently seconded as Chief Scientific Advisor and Director of Research and Evidence at the UK Government’s Department for International Development (DFID).